a brief history of Scone

“..whom we invite to see us crowned at Scone“….  Macbeth

~~~~~~~~~~~~

For Leanne Cole’s  theme of travel this week, I chose the Maze at Scone, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. To me a maze is symbolic of traveling through life with it’s turns and sometimes dead ends, searching for the heart’s meaning, and as the maze is also a walking meditation; the center signifies peace. So here is..

A Brief History of Scone

the-maze

A hauntingly beautiful piece called The Gael ( by Dougie MacLean)

Scone (pronounced like Skune) has been inhabited since Pictish times and was the site of an early Christian church. It achieved abbey status in the 12th century. It was also famous for the Gaelic “Lia Fail” or Stone of Destiny.  Scottish kings were crowned on this stone beginning with the chieftain Kenneth MacAlpin, a Pictish king who chose Scone as his capital in the 9th century. Robert the Bruce was crowned on Moot Hill in 1306.

Moot Hill
Moot Hill

The palace that stands today was built in the Gothic style of architecture and finished in 1808.  A broad tree lined avenue leads up to the gates.

Queen's Road
The old road

Through the centuries, the honours of Scotland (scepter and crown jewels) were moved frequently to protect them from enemies. The Stone of Destiny (or Stone of Scone), however, had been taken to England in 1296 by Edward I (Longshanks) in his attempt to subdue Scotland. In recent times Elizabeth II sat on the Stone of Scone for her coronation as monarch of both kingdoms.

The stone remained in England until 1950 when  four Scottish student nationalists managed to steal it from Westminster Abbey and take it back to Scotland.  It was later discovered in Glasgow where it had been broken and mended in the venture.  “A stonemason, Baillie Robert Gray, had been hired to mend the stone. Gray placed a brass rod inside the Stone containing a piece of paper. To this day, nobody knows what was written on it.

Stone of Scone on Moot Hill (replica)
Stone of Scone on Moot Hill (replica)

In April 1951 the police received a tip-off and the Stone was found on the site of the High Altar at Arbroath Abbey where in 1320 the assertion of Scottish nationhood was made in the Declaration of Arbroath. The Stone was returned to Westminster Abbey in February 1952.” (wikipedia)  England decided to give it back in 1996 and it now resides in Edinburgh Castle. Scotland remains deeply divided on the issue of Independence.

robert-the-bruce
the crowning of Robert the Bruce ( Edinburgh Castle)

The grounds of the Palace are very beautiful and interesting to me. Many don’t know that the mighty and majestic Douglas Fir trees that are native to North America from British Columbia down to central California, were named after Scottish Botanist David Douglas. They were imported by him from the Pacific Northwest to the Scone palace grounds where they have thrived.

(click to “embiggen” images)

62 Comments Add yours

  1. NocturnalJen says:

    Scone palace is super close to where I live! Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So glad you enjoyed it!!! Lucky you to live close by!!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. wildalchemi says:

    I got lost in the Mist and the Music, Brilliant Post ❀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. so pleased you like it! Thank you wild magical woman!!

      Like

  3. Nice post! I enjoyed listening to the music while reading, too. Your creativity is fun and enjoyable. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. very pleased! thanks!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Norma says:

    Thanks, Moon for such a wonderful and informative post along with those mesmerizing photos. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. it’s a very beautiful place!!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Norma says:

        Glad you could be there to share such beautiful pictures and tales of the place. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      2. and so pleased you enjoyed it!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. I’m a Scot. You had me at Scone. x

    Liked by 1 person

    1. so pleased. If a Scot likes my post on Scotland!! πŸ˜€ I visit Scotland whenever I can. I still have cousins there. I always miss it!!

      Like

      1. Wonderful. I love when folks visit my country. (Listen to that eh? MY country. It is a great post and I had awe laugh over you putting in the pronunciation. We have friends down south and they always pronounced it as scone as in a scone. I ahd this vision of a palace made out of scones…. x

        Liked by 1 person

      2. ps I love scones too!

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Where over here was your mum born? I am so excited that she was. Now I see why you love it here so much. xxxxxx

      Liked by 1 person

      1. she was born in Glasgow but the family hail from both Perthshire and the Black Isle (Rosemarkie) and great grandparents on Lewis and Skye as well.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. The people moved about a lot really when you think about it. Perthshire is lovely, bits are quite Highland. We live about 40 mins away from Perth itself.

        Like

      3. it’s such a lovely area, Perth and Kinross! Where do you live?

        Like

  6. Love the old road – you know it’s just going to end at some magical place and it does!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. it does!! thank you!

      Like

  7. Ali Isaac says:

    Words fail me, Cybele! These images are so MAGICAL! πŸ’•

    Liked by 1 person

    1. oh thank you Ali!! It’s such an interesting story there too. I have had to put the blog on the back burner while we do everything needing doing at the new place. I’m quite exhausted and suffering from post traumatic move syndrome. I will be over to see you soon!!

      Like

  8. Ann says:

    Reblogged this on Ann Cavitt Fisher and commented:
    Each time I visit Cybele’s blog, The Runes of the Gatekeeper’s Daughter, her images fill me with a great sense of peace and serenity. So follow this back to the original, and have a wander through her other posts and pictures. Enjoy!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am so very honoured Ann!

      Like

  9. Donna Georgina Hardy says:

    Dear Dune Mouse…Though I do not comment often, please know how I appreciate your lyrical, magical posts which soothe the soul.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. so appreciated my dear friend!

      Like

  10. Magical, it reminds me of Harry Potter.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. it does now that you mention it!! Thanks Lore!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. pattimoed says:

    Great post, Cybele, and photos. I love how you conjure up an aura of mystery in your shots. Magical, no doubt.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m honoured Patti!!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. smilecalm says:

    haunting, yes!
    beautiful, too πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. many thanks my friend!

      Like

  13. This post has it all–great storytelling, compelling stories, excellent photos, and even a great soundtrack! I would think so even if I hadn’t just come from Edinburgh, which I really enjoyed. Thanks so much for taking me back, even for just a little while.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. thank you so much Naomi!! Glad you popped over!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Fascinating history Cybele, fantastic photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. many thanks Della!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. I love labyrinths and mazes Cybele and the history of Scone is fascinating πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. me too Andrea, thank you! ( I’m still behind here a bit)

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Adrian Lewis says:

    Especially love the maze picture! A

    Liked by 1 person

    1. many thanks Adrian!

      Like

  17. Emilio Pasquale says:

    Beautiful images as always. And very informative!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. thank you Emilio!

      Like

  18. Sherry Felix says:

    Fabulous history. I love the haunting images, especially the maze, and the music. Top notch Cybele.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. thanks so much Sherry, so glad you enjoyed the music too!

      Liked by 1 person

  19. aidymcglynn says:

    Haven’t been on wordpress for a while Cybele, so probably missed a lot of posts, but these are great – lovely dreamlike quality.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. no worries Aidy, I have slowed down a bit due to moving and other life events!!

      Liked by 1 person

    2. ps: good to hear from you!

      Like

  20. All engaging, and the first image stole my repeated viewing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. so pleased you liked it Sally!

      Like

  21. Moz Loordes says:

    Fascinating and nice to see the Highland Cattle there πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. oh we love those coos!! πŸ™‚ and of course such compelling history! And Scotland inspires the telling of stories!

      Like

  22. Maverick ~ says:

    Interesting bit of history highlighted beautifully with your images.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. thank you Maverick as always!! πŸ™‚

      Like

  23. disperser says:

    Interesting piece of history.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. isn’t it!! So many stories!

      Like

  24. katieprior says:

    Very atmospheric, beautiful pictures. Love the coos! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. thank you Katie!! Me too!

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Anita says:

    Interesting piece of history there…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. thanks for visiting Anita!!

      Liked by 1 person

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